Archive for the ‘Garden Patio Furniture’ Category

More Oktoberfest Formats, Staging And Food Pairings

October 11, 2014 4:49 pm
posted by Peter
Teak Oval Extension Table

Teak Oval Extension Table

Previous: Oktoberfest Beer Tasting (10/9/2014)  I mentioned the vertical format (one brand, several varieties). Other formats include blind: one style, several brands with guests tasting and naming which brand is which. Another is microbrews from lightest in color and alcohol to darkest in color and highest in alcohol. Or several brands of one style appropriate to the season (Oktoberfest, summer ales, etc.)

Set up a large table anywhere as the stage for your tasting. Since guests will be swallowing and not spitting out their beer when tasting, provide water to rinse tasting glasses and a “swill” bucket to empty them between each beer. Guests should have a clear tasting glass, glass of water, and pen and paper to take notes. If available, provide beer guides or style books for your guests’ convenience. Also handy is a beer menu: each beer tasted (in order), brewer, style and other relevant information.

Cheeses, fruits, and breads and crackers, maybe some deli meats and patés pair well with beer. Or pair your food to the style of beer. Oktoberfest beers pair with German food but also with baked ham, barbecued beef or pork, pizza, grilled veggies and chicken, and steak.

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Stage An Oktoberfest In Your Home Or Garden

October 9, 2014 9:00 am
posted by Peter
20-in. Planter with Trellis

20-in. Planter with Trellis

Celebrating Oktoberfest can get expensive for you and your friends, especially with cover charges for live entertainment. Instead, invite friends to your home for a beer tasting!

Beer tastings are gaining popularity. They can be less expensive than wine tastings, although some craft beers and microbrews can be pricey. Create a budget covering the costs of the beers you select plus food. Plan to serve at least four varieties (at 3 ounces per guest) for the tasting plus additional beer (of any type) for post-tasting enjoyment. Add seasonal lights to my 20-inch planter with trellis and it’s a decorative cooler for the beer.

One tasting format is the vertical tasting: one brand, several varieties. For example, Samuel Adams has different beers for assembling a good “flight” for your tasting. Its Web site has sample flights assembled by others and provides a way to choose your tasting’s beers. One sample: Sam Adams Boston Lager, Oktoberfest, Maple Pecan Porter and Harvest Pumpkin Ale. Many local liquor stores might not stock many varieties, but they might steer you to stores that do or will special order them for you. Next: Another Tasting Format plus Food for Your Tasting

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Gardening Tips For Preparing Or Repairing Your Fall Garden

September 5, 2014 3:08 pm
posted by Peter

 

5-pc. Planter Set w/ Trellis

5-pc. Planter Set w/ Trellis

Planning on reseeding your lawn? Try a dethatching rake to cultivate soil and cut back weeds like clover, strawberry and crabgrass. Dig out violets and similar weeds. The grass seed requires good soil contact and daily watering. Need to totally renovate a weedy lawn (not merely overseed your existing lawn)? Use an herbicide first to kill the vegetation. It may take two or three applications of non-selective herbicide, such as glyphosate, Wait at least a week after last application to sow the fresh lawn (follow label directions). 

Hedges “tired”? Shrubs overgrown? Plan now to clear beds and select fresh plant material. Match your replacement plantings to soil and light conditions and size of space. You may find that perennials are more appropriate for a particular space than another woody plant. Deadheading improves a plant’s looks, prevents seediness and may promote reblooming. Remove the flower to a healthy set of leaves or entire stalks, if necessary.

Harvest your herbs for drying and storing. Pick thyme, oregano and basil leaves in early morning. Harvest mint at midday; oils are at their peak at that time. Plant fall-blooming perennials to give your garden a pop of color. Chrysanthemums, asters and goldenrod are great for beds, borders and containers.

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Happy Labor Day To All Workers Everywhere!

September 1, 2014 9:00 am
posted by Peter
Adirondack Table Set

Adirondack Table Set

Labor Day (in the United States the first Monday in September) is dedicated to honoring the contributions workers make to the strength, prosperity and well-being of their countries.

In the United States Labor Day was first celebrated as a holiday on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. By 1885 Labor Day was celebrated in many industrial centers throughout the United States.

The vital force of labor has contributed to a high standard of living and brings us closer to achieving the ideals of economic and political democracy. Although workers may not be as respected as they used to be, on Labor Day let us remember that they are the people who design, create and produce the products you buy … including the furniture sold on this Web site.

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Autumn Tips To Wrap Up And Set Up Your Garden (II)

August 31, 2014 12:00 pm
posted by Peter

30" Garden Hutch

30″ Garden Hutch

(Continued from post of August 29, 2014)

Plant a Final Crop

Plant a final crop in September. Many vegetables mature from seed to table in four to six weeks, providing a harvest by late October or early November. Radishes take about 25 days, and some leafy greens like spinach grow in as little as 40 days.

Plant Shrubs and Saplings

Autumn is the best time to add trees and shrubs, because it allows their roots to establish while avoiding the heat of summer sun. Plant trees and shrubs a few weeks before the first frost. If you live in an area with colder temperatures and heavy snows, wrap branches and leaves in burlap to protect them from their first winter.

Trim Perennials

After your garden has gone to seed, trim your perennials. This will tidy an overgrown garden, encourage more energy in the plants for the coming year, and discourage problems like powdery mildew or insect infestations.

Fertilize!

While your lawn might appear dormant for the season, a little care in the fall guarantees a lush, green garden for the spring. Beneath the soil your lawn is still establishing a strong root system. You can boost this process by distributing a good mix of phosphorus-rich fertilizer.

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Autumn Tips To Wrap Up And Set Up Your Garden (I)

August 29, 2014 6:45 pm
posted by Peter

 

 

Various Planter and Garden Boxes

Various Planter and Garden Boxes

As summer gardening season wanes, it’s time to get the most out of the end of the growing season and set up your garden for next year.

Plant Spring Bulbs

Plant bulbs like tulips, irises and crocuses in the fall, since they need a winter freeze to begin their growing process. Plant when temperatures are in 40s and 50s but several weeks before a complete freeze.

Stock Up at Discount Prices

Purchase gardening equipment, seeds and plants at discounted prices, as many garden centers slash prices in the fall to clear out unsold inventory. Store seed packets in the freezer to maintain freshness, and maintain seedlings indoors until safe to replant them in the spring.

Repot Overgrown Plants

If your plants have outgrown their locations, replant in larger containers or move to a location that will accommodate their size. Signs that plants are root-bound and require more space are dense or compacted soil, poor drainage, or roots growing out of the bottom of a planter.

Plant Winter-Loving Specimens

Summer isn’t the only time to grow vegetables. Depending on your growing region, plants like kale, lettuce, broccoli and chard can thrive in colder temperatures and even tolerate occasional frost. As long as there’s no snow on the ground and the mercury doesn’t linger below freezing, these plants will grow well into the winter. (Continued)

 

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Fountains And Pools: Visually Appealing And Tranquil Features

August 15, 2014 3:00 pm
posted by Peter

 

6-ft. Garden Bridge (also 3 ft. & 8 ft.)

6-ft. Garden Bridge (also 3 ft., 8 ft. & 12 ft.)

Fountains and small ornamental pools built among complementary landscaping provide cooling, soothing reminders of creeks and rivers and, many owners attest, relief from the stresses of work and family obligations. Aquatic features also pull the garden together visually by focusing eyes on the water and may increase a property’s value.

However, water features can set off other problems – mosquitoes, clogged filters and leaky liners, for example – that require sometimes costly attention. As a result, many people wind up spending money on maintenance they may not recover when selling the property. In addition, many house shoppers are intimidated by fish ponds or a fountain, no matter how well designed, because of the thought of the cost and effort required for maintenance. The same concerns can frighten away prospective buyers when they see swimming pools.

If you decide to add a water feature, fountains and pools can run smoothly – even year-round – with the right planning and design. Also, if properly installed, a water feature need not require a lot of maintenance. For example, aquatic plants are key to keeping the water clean. Water lilies, water hyacinths, cattails and other vegetation increase oxygen levels and filter and shade the water. The water will be cleaner the more plants there are. Approximately 66 percent of the water surface should be covered with plants.

Try adding goldfish to your water feature. The fish benefit the pond’s (and your) health by eating mosquito larvae and algae. The fish will require water at least 18 inches deep; I recently read about one owner whose pool is 2½ feet deep so the water doesn’t freeze, and the fish are kept alive, during winter months. Absent plants and fish, some ponds and pools may suffer from too much sunlight and low oxygen levels; and, as a result, an abundance of slimy algae develops. You can solve this problem by adding chemicals to the water. Or, tossing a few (about five to seven) pre-1982 copper pennies can prevent algae growth in bird baths. Pennies issued before 1982 contain copper, a natural algicide. A small piece of copper pipe or tubing or other copper coin will work, too. Don’t use this trick in ponds or pools containing fish, as the metal may be detrimental to their health.

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More Tips For Increasing Blooms On Hydrangeas

August 8, 2014 2:00 pm
posted by Peter

 

6-ft. Raised Garden Box (double)

6-ft. Raised Garden Box (double)

Try using half the amount of fertilizer recommended on the product label to help increase bloom yield instead of additional leafy growth.

Relocate your bushes to a more hospitable location (see previous post). Prune mature shrubs to a manageable size, and dig up as large a root ball as you can handle. Place root ball in a new hole, fill in, add a slow-release fertilizer, water well, and cover with two inches of organic compost. It’s best to move hydrangeas when the bushes are dormant in early spring or late fall.

If you want to share your hydrangeas with friends or family, or spread them around your yard, several propagation techniques work well, including layering and dividing. The following method for rooting softwood cuttings in summer should yield many new plants in about four weeks.

Locate a stem of softwood between the hard, woody growth at the bottom of the plant and the fleshy green tip by bending it; softwood should snap cleanly. Cut a softwood shoot that has several leaves. Trim into 5-inch-long pieces each with a leaf toward the top. Remove extra leaves. Cut remaining leaf at the top in half (minimizes evaporation and the need to water). Dip other end in powdered rooting hormone. Plant cuttings in trays filled with soilless mix and perlite. Cover with a plastic bag, and place in a shady location. Raised garden boxes may provide a safe location for your trays. Mist regularly to maintain leaf hydration. After four weeks, tug on the cutting to check for roots. When roots are developed, transplant to a bigger pot and feed with a slow-release fertilizer. If successful, these cuttings should be ready to plant next spring.

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How To Coax Better Blooms From Your Hydrangeas (I)

August 1, 2014 1:24 pm
posted by Peter
Hydrangeas

Hydrangeas

We called them snowball bushes when I was young. They are hydrangeas, a colorful summertime staple in yards across the country. The hydrangea is usually a reliable, months-long bloomer. However, in many areas of the United States, last winter’s “polar vortex” devastated many otherwise reliable plants, such as camellias, hybrid tea roses, rosemaries and, yes, hydrangeas. An expert at the National Arboretum in Washington, D.C., reported that for hydrangeas suffering from winter kill, she had to remove all the old top growth (instead of the usual one-third of old branches) to allow fresh growth. No blooms are expected from these plants this season. If you did the same, I hope you removed dead branches and not old wood. The old wood is the source of buds for new growth.

If your hydrangeas are doing relatively well, you can coax them to perform better. Hydrangeas need some sun and like some shade. The farther north they are, the more sun they can tolerate; in the South, maybe three hours of sun. Many types love a coastal setting, where breezes can dissipate heat. Other varieties tolerate high heat and sun exposure, while others are bred for more-shady conditions.

(To be continued)

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Rehab Your Deck Decor For Relaxing And Entertaining

July 29, 2014 4:57 pm
posted by Peter

 

Patio Umbrella - UB33

Patio Umbrella – UB33

Is your deck décor looking drab and tired? You can rehab it with a few new pieces of furniture and some planters and rugs. Here are some ideas to get you started … just in time for Labor Day festivities!

Wicker furniture paired with cushions (use bright colors and designs) manufactured for the outdoors (moisture-, mildew-, soil- and ultraviolet-light-resistant) create a lovely, comfortable, living-room-style seating arrangement for reading, relaxing and entertaining. If you have enough space, arrange separate areas for dining and relaxing. Use umbrellas in both areas to provide shade. Scatter some outdoor rugs in colorful designs to provide a change in pattern for the neutral deck. Scatter container gardens in a variety of planters (cedar, ceramic, plastic, even metal) to add pops of color throughout the deck.

Finally, (again, if you have the room) arrange a bar area between two arbors or behind one arbor, which should be able to accommodate at least one and maybe two bar stools.

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